JORGE GOTUZZO
INNOVATIONS, SUSTAINABILITY
AND THE FOOD CRISIS IN 2050

Multilingual, multi-cultural builder of international brands, Jorge Gotuzzo has digitally transformed Pace International—and offers his insights to avert the food crises in 2050.

A thought leader and innovator, our colleague, Jorge Gotuzzo embraces technology in an industry that’s been slow to digitize: produce. He’s traveled extensively, lived in multiple countries, and managed diverse food-related brands around the globe, always focused on sustainability and shared responsibility. Since 2014, he has been applying his skills as Global Marketing Director at Pace International, the world’s leader in post-harvest produce solutions, in order to do his part to help prevent a global food shortage.

Pace International is a subsidiary of Valent BioSciences Corporation (of Sumitomo Chemical Company) and the leading provider of postharvest solutions for produce, Pace International works to improve the quality of fruits and vegetables through innovative solutions and services.

I recently connected with Jorge to discuss food production in today’s world, and how we can avoid world hunger in 2050.

Mary Olson

You’ve said that the world is in danger of running out of food, and I believe you, since you understand today’s food production systems better than anyone I know. I wanted to dive into root causes.

For example, we Americans have been conditioned to select fruits and vegetables that appear cosmetically perfect. How might that impact us in the decades to come?

Jorge Gotuzzo

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), when you measure all produce from harvest to consumer usage, more than 45% of all fruits and vegetables go unused. That is almost half our global production!

7 billion people are alive today. By 2050, that number is expected to reach 9 billion. The question isn’t just how we produce more food to feed the growing population, but how we reduce overall waste. The looming crisis requires both food production innovations and changes in consumer behavior.

We must do much better. Imagine if the discarded product can get distributed to food programs in poor communities, rather than going straight to landfill? Imagine replacing processed snacks at schools with healthy and nutritious food, made from fruits and vegetables that would otherwise be thrown out. Just these things alone would be game changing.

Earthquake devastation in Haiti. Alltech 2010

Mary Olson

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere. It was devastated by a 2010 earthquake, which killed more than 160,000 and displaced 1.6 million people.

At the time, you were with Alltech—and living in Port-au-Prince. For a decade, you managed marketing initiatives in dairy, beef, and aquaculture on behalf of this global biotech company working to boost the health of plants and animals using nature and science.

After the earthquake, you led the Sustainable Haiti Project, and Alltech adopted a small school. What can you tell us about your experience there? How did the widespread devastation affect your views on humanity, corporate philanthropy, and the need for sustainability?

Gotuzzo, speaking of his mission in founding the Sustainable Haiti Project.

Jorge Gotuzzo:

While at Alltech, I was able to spend three months working with Haitian children and helped develop a sustainable coffee project. After the earthquake, Alltech adopted a small school to resume education—in spite of the widespread devastation. All of these experiences were life altering for me.

At that time, the company was the title sponsor of the World Equestrian Games (WEG2010) and our dream was to put together a children’s choir and to bring it to the U.S. for the opening ceremony performance. We wanted to show Haiti to the world through these beautiful little voices—and raise awareness about the recovery efforts.

Three months later, in time for start of the games, I found myself in Lexington, Kentucky with 26 children, two teachers, and one Catholic nun. That experience changed my life forever and helped me understand how lucky we are and how grateful we should be every day we’re alive.

Mary Olson

That’s beautiful, and very inspiring.

Data allows us to listen, engage, communicate, and act faster—and with greater accuracy. But the food industry’s been slow to adopt it—and embrace the digital advances available today.

You recently led a holistic online rebranding effort—and introduced an innovative digital product catalog that stands out as a “first” among all Sumitomo Chemical companies. How did you help Pace International break the mold of slow adoption?

Jorge Gotuzzo

Culturally, Pace International is all about innovation and technology. We are always looking for new ways of supporting our customers, their consumers, and the industry overall.

But there was a disconnect between our digital efforts and the day-to-day business. The digital experience we offered the customer was falling behind—and causing the company as a whole to miss out on our best opportunity to engage. To stay current, we had to step up our game and create a digital face-lift. We committed to this—and elevated the entire brand experience.

I enjoy operating in an ever-increasing complex digital realm. I look forward to putting my energies toward innovations that sustain the world and meet people’s needs. It’s a win for me, a win for my company, and a win for society. I hope.
________________________________________________________

Feel free to connect with Mary Olson or Jorge Gotuzzo for further information.

Mary Olson
Email: maryolson@maryolson.biz
Phone: 917.656.1856
Blog: maryolson.biz/blog
LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maryolsonbiz
Twitter: https://twitter.com/maryolsonbiz

Jorge Gotuzzo
Email: jgotuzzo@gmail.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jorgegotuzzo
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gotu10

Links:
Pace International Website
Wikipedia – Haiti Earthquake
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

HARISH PANT
GLOBAL VISIONARY

Harish Pant is a business visionary with a fascinating—and unusual—spiritual outlook. A thought leader, columnist, and public speaker, his worldview makes him a global treasure. Millions agree: Harish is among the Top 1% most followed connections in LinkedIn.

Among his other accolades: aerospace, automotive and steel executive; poet; founding member of Make-in-India National Committee (MINCO); distinguished alumna and fellow of Institution of Engineers (FIE); member of the Advisory Committee AIMA Bangalore; council member of the Indian Institution of Industrial Engineers (IIIE); member of the Aeronautical Society of India and SAE; member of the LASSIB Society; recipient of Immai Operational Excellence Award and the Mother Teresa Excellence Award and Award for Industrial Development; corporate member of the Society of Indian Aerospace Technologies, UK Trade and Investment and Executive Board of Indian Society for Advancement of Materials.

I recently asked Harish about transcending today’s world of digitally driven accelerated growth models versus creating steady, sustainable business value. His insights were transformative.

MARY OLSON: Harish, your poetry is illuminating. It is unusual that a business executive produces such vibrant clarity of thought to transcend business-speak into something universal and unforgettable.

HARISH PANT: We are human beings, personal beings, social beings and professional beings.

Without human values, all the riches of the world come to naught! As humans, we are endowed with a unique consciousness, which can flow to merge with super-consciousness, or make us aware of our intellectual, emotional, and physical beings.

The personal realm is “Me,” the microcosmic world where we play. It encompasses the immediate vicinity of your life envelope time and space.

The social milieu is “We” and Us”. It’s broader: say, your extended family. Imagine expanding that to your country, and even to all of Planet Earth.

Finally, there’s your professional world, where skills, capabilities and work give you an opportunity to create value for yourself and others. In exchange, this world provides an opportunity to engage others to create value for you!

At times, we float with curiosity and creativity and in another, we cling to our existential being—especially when life becomes challenging. In our most vibrant being, our soul, we experience life’s true amplitude!

“Soul” manifests through the eyes and ears of consciousness. A resonance creates a sound, leading to words and thoughts, which in turn may find expression in the form of a poem. That’s the natural way a poet can shine through.

At every level of human existence, we find people who rise in their evolutionary journeys and also have the grit and tenacity to transform themselves and others. We have potential to transcend, or levitate from one level to another. Notes of all four beings—the human, personal, social and professional—can produce a blissful life’s lyrics, once imbued in self awareness, without tradeoffs whatsoever!

Curiosity and learning pursuits have ushered me to many molding processes, helped gain wisdom in enlightening events and also connected me to wonderful people around the world. Life lessons and challenges have led me to be “Poetic” at times and an Astute professional in others.


NOAA Colorized Satellite Map of India

MARY OLSON: You are India’s thought leader inasmuch as you write about reinventing India’s supply chain, the cloud, and GST for a changing world. What is the state of business in India today, and how do you envision the future of business there?

HARISH PANT: India has barely 2.4% of land area but hosts 17.84% of the world’s population, securing third place in the world’s economy (based on PPP) and seventh place (based on nominal GDP). Multi-faceted in every way imaginable, and rooted in ancient cultures, our diversity and unique demographic makes for a bizarre concoction of humanity.

The economy pouring out of this hotpot puts everything to the test: if you can carry it out here, you can take it anywhere! A critical geopolitical position and vast coastline offer a unique payout for every world economic player, making us a phenomenal trade center for the world.

The world of “Nothingness” and the world of “Everything” coexist in India and these two world forces make any linear move both revolving and rotational. The value proposition in India has to either pass through the grail of “Nothingness” (Value for Money) or “Everything” (Aspirational). With advent of right technology and it’s maturation, evolution explodes when these worlds meet (Aspiration x Value for Money), and growth becomes exponential.

Further complicating the landscape are socio-economic factors like corruption, money laundering, and economic disparity etc., to name a few which will dissipate with a holistic growth framework of services consisting of product and services, ecosystem services, and social services.

The world’s economy reveals its “stretched-borrowed” capital and abusive timelines. We experience over-consumption and related macroeconomic problems; and including sustainability, global warming, terrorism and the nuisance of power games and military might. All are looking towards India to partner for business growth.

DY Photography 2015

In the above context, the country’s position is notably unmatched. Some unusual contrasts promote it as a desirable multi-national partner. To name a few:

  • It wants to lead the world—but not by might. For example, it remains devoid of territorial or military ambitions.
  • It aspires to be an economic superpower, but does not have a political or societal mandate for an unchecked, single-minded pursuit, like, say, China.
  • It has deep-rooted religious and social moorings, stemming from ancient wisdoms. It also has the bandwidth to absorb its many religions and cultures into “One India.”
  • It aspires for Everything material, but finds peace in the immaterial.

Now, with this positioning, India is at an inflection point on the world stage. Although the global economy struggles, India’s growth potential remains consistently immense.

Digitization, IT, and telecommunication will unleash more innovation, entrepreneurship, and expansion in India in the coming years. E-commerce, GST rollout, and infrastructure development will also help eliminate meddling, for disruptive changes in supply chain management.

India does not have any choice but to leapfrog from “Nowhere” to the center of the world stage, where new games and new rules will be written by new world players.

Falling oil prices, an impetus on solar energy, innovative mobility solutions, better infrastructure and connected smart cities and villages would certainly help in dramatically reducing the import bill and help India with much-needed funds and time to reorient itself on a development path. New economic structure sprouting out of startup, skill development and similar government initiatives bode well for the growth of the nation.

While the strategic investment in defense and aerospace would mark India in the top three, Make-in-India’s drive would have India competing with China. Alternative medicine, life wellness through yoga, social enterprises and education would provide low-cost life support while other growth areas like agriculture and associated industries would provide sustenance.

India is having its moment ripe for world engagement, but with approaches that will create a new world order.


MARY OLSON: You write about business excellence, curiosity, creativity and commitment in an ever-changing volatile world.

With rare exception, every traditional business has been digitally disrupted by what most of us now call the digital economy.

Douglas Rushkoff writes that business disruption is not the “fault” of digital technology. It is the fault of a digitally charged business model that stresses efficiency and corporate growth at the expense of the human beings they should be serving. Somehow, growth has become an end in itself, with human beings its impediments.

If you could change the rules of business today and mobilize everybody you know, how would you implore your colleagues to create ongoing value for owners, employees, and customers? Or, rather than living and dying by business growth rates, how can business value be made truly sustainable?

HARISH PANT: Every human evolution necessitates even greater value and commitment. Now, even a small act has far-reaching implications. We see the travesty of:

  • Relentless greed that cannot be checked by high taxation and mandated Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives.
  • The possession of discretionary funds creates many personal, social and health problems.
  • The principle of “might is right” does not bring peace, or solve world’s problems.
  • That it’s “not my problem” is a problem! We live in an integrated world.

The ever-expanding gap between scarcity and abundance, resulting from advancing technology, has created an uncertain, volatile, chaotic and ambiguous world. We want to truncate the world, abstracting value to make money—and keep feeding relentless human desires.

As the world (and humanity) matures, we are creating and expanding many economic, social, technological and personal platforms that connect the whole world. It’s time we integrate ourselves: not through a single currency of money—but a green currency of ecosystem services and a currency of social services. Donations and philanthropy cannot solve the world’s problems! Attitudes have to change. Also, government and business need to stop working with contrary and disjointed sets of objectives.

Each economic act has to create wealth in all three of these currencies, and one cannot be earned at the expense of the other. For example, if there is a massive job redundancy due to digitization, then the organization should be required to provide for social impacts, and prove its business sustainable. The point isn’t to create a socialistic society. Instead, human evolution demands a wholesome approach than the singular pursuit of greed. To be able to refrain from creating hell on earth is not enough, we need to structure it anew for generating a holistic wealth positively impacting economy, society and our ecosystem.

We must dramatically change the rule of the game, adopting a circle of human values that can provide endless opportunity to contribute and make the world better. For example, we can invite main stakeholders to be share holders in an enterprise through a new equity structure framework and a minimum debt is financed through green commitment towards ecosystem services and social good.

Welcome to the new world order where the wealth of all three currencies would rule… not money alone!

The next technological challenge is to create an algorithm that relates money, green, and social good, or alternatively take a few best ancient religious books and follows a common wisdom. Or, it can be to be simply human!

What’s your choice?! Let’s pause to understand consequences of our choices and actions not only rationally but relationally as well.

Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam is a Sanskrit phrase found in Hindu texts such as the Maha Upanishad, which means “The world is one family”.

The World is One Family

One is a relative, the other stranger,
say the small minded.
The entire world is a family,
live the magnanimous.

Be detached,
be magnanimous,
lift up your mind, enjoy
the fruit of Brahmanic freedom.

—This verse of Maha Upanishad is engraved in the entrance hall of the Parliament of India. 6.71-75

“Our creations must take people to that wordless world which is the real essence on which the small physical world floats!”

Harish Pant
2016

Feel free to connect with Mary Olson or Harish Pant for further information.

Mary Olson
Email: maryolson@maryolson.biz
Phone: 917.656.1856
Blog: maryolson.biz/blog
LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maryolsonbiz
Twitter: @maryolsonbiz

Harish Pant
Email: harish.pant@hotmail.com
LinkedIn: https://in.linkedin.com/in/harishpant
Twitter: @h_pant

FRANK ROSE
DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION
& THE ART OF IMMERSION

Frank Rose is simply the most extraordinary expert in the entertainment and marketing fields and my most favorite thought leader on new forms of narrative.

Rose, a Senior Fellow at Columbia University School of the Arts, a member of the Columbia Digital Storytelling Lab, and faculty co-leader of its executive education seminar on digital storytelling strategy is also a longtime writer for Wired, strategy+business and author of The Art of Immersion.

Rose allows that every new digital medium has disrupted the grammar of narrative.

Frank’s seminal work on immersive storytelling and his new focus on The Science of Story, unlock the future for every brand to deliver today’s business value.

Follow FR if you want to know where your brand narrative should be heading, assuming you are leading your company toward transformational innovation and engaging people in these digitally disruptive times.

MARY OLSON: I often wonder where your appetite for new knowledge has taken you since 2012. What are your thoughts as you look back on the four years since publishing The Art of Immersion? How have your views changed?

FRANK ROSE: Well, obviously many of the TV shows I wrote about—Lost and The Office and Mad Men, among others—are no longer on the air, although their impact is still felt and their place in pop culture is pretty well assured.

Entertainment and marketing are if anything even more game-like and participatory than when I wrote the book.

Social media is more important than ever.

The big change is virtual reality and the incredible excitement it’s generated, even though most people still don’t even know it exists. Newspapers are jumping in— The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today.

Advertisers are jumping in. And it seems to be generating, even more, excitement for its storytelling possibilities than for games.

Obviously, VR is extremely immersive—that’s its appeal. But in other ways, it runs entirely against the grain of digital media as we’ve known it to date.

Yes, you can tweet about it, but there’s nothing inherently social about having your head encased in goggles. And unlike conventional video, it breaks completely with the grammar of cinema that was developed at the dawn of the motion picture industry. Cuts, pans, fades—none of these work in 360 videos.

There are some great pioneers at work—people like Eugene Chung at Penrose and Edward Saatchi at Oculus. I suspect it’ll be awhile—and to the extent that it’s adopted, will take us in a direction most people haven’t thought about.

MO: Your chapter, How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall Apart includes philosophical and Zen-like views. Social culture and media narratives seem more and more delusional these days. How do you feel about the way the world is emerging?

FR: When I wrote that, I imagined the world of Disney and the world of Philip K. Dick [the American science fiction writer whose novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep was the basis for Blade Runner] as opposites, in style if not necessarily in substance.

But the Walt Disney Company has evolved far beyond Walt himself, and the world is growing closer and closer to the highly disconcerting visions of PKD. A crypto-fascist reality TV star for president.

I suspect the purchase of Lucasfilm and the revival of the Star Wars franchise are going to bring these two closer together than ever. The differences in style will be minimized. And digital technology and the thirst for immersive experiences are only going to accelerate the process.

As I wrote in the book, digital technology blurs dividing lines that were considered sacrosanct in the industrial era—between author and audience, story and game, content and advertising, fiction and reality.

Who can tell the difference any more? That’s why we hunger for authenticity.

MO: The way businesses need to communicate is changing. Where is your journey taking you next?

FR: I’m very excited about my projects at the Columbia Digital Storytelling Lab — both the semi-annual executive education seminar Digital Storytelling Strategy, coming up on April 21, and the first annual Digital Dozen: Breakthroughs in Storytelling, which we announced in late January and followed up with a live event at Lincoln Center last month.

There’s also my blog, Deep Media, which chronicles new developments in storytelling, including some of my projects. Next up will be the DSS seminar focusing on “The Science of Story”. The first segment is titled, “Why Stories? Why Now?” and explains how stories are changing in response to digital technology and how immersion is more sought-after than ever.

“The Science of Story” follows up with an account of recent neuroscience and cognitive psychology research that demonstrates how compelling stories are at changing people’s beliefs and explains why that might be.

MO: Thank you, Frank. Your insights inform not only corporate strategists but watchful adopters, too. We all benefit from your futurist insights about how authentic stories transform people’s behaviors and inform digital marketing and transformative business models.

# # #

Download a PDF of The Power of Immersive Media
The most successful advertising today convincingly takes on the qualities of real experience. By Frank Rose. Publisher: strategy + business on February 9, 2015.

Feel free to get in touch with Mary Olson or Frank Rose for further information.

Mary Olson
Email: maryolson@maryolson.biz
Phone: 917.656.1856
Blog: maryolson.biz/blog
LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maryolsonbiz
Twitter: @maryolsonbiz

Frank Rose
Email: frank@frankrose.com
Twitter: @frankrose
Website: The Art of Immersion – artofimmersion.com/
Blog: deepmediaonline.com/
Member: Columbia Digital Storytelling Lab
Digital Dozen: Breakthroughs in Storytelling
Senior Fellow: Columbia University School of the Arts
LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/frankrose

15 BEST BOOKS OF 2014

Here are my 15 BEST BOOKS OF 2014-15 beginning with Jim Signorelli’s brilliantly inventive StoryBranding 2.0 to America’s master writer Laura Brown and How To Write Anything: A Complete Guide; to Thomas Nazario and Renée C. Byer’s searing stories and groundbreaking photojournalism in Living on a Dollar a Day, The Lives and Faces of The World’s Poor; to Kellmereit and Obodovski’s account of The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things; to Marc Gobe’s Emotional Branding; to Joey Reiman’s The Story of Purpose: The Path to Creating a Brighter Brand, a Greater Company, and a Lasting Legacy; to Kent Calder’s Asia in Washington: Exploring the Penumbra of Transnational Power; to Paul Taylor’s The Next America; to Jaron Lanier’s Who Owns the Future? to Charlotte Beyer’s Wealth Management Unwrapped, to Blyth’s Zen and Zen Classics; and Noah Horowitz’s Art of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market.

I recommend that you sign-up for Smile.Amazon.com. Amazon donates 0.5% of the price of your AmazonSmile purchases to the charitable organization of your choice. My favorite charity is The Forgotten International.

Please enjoy my 15 most current reads:


Al-Qaeda: From Global Network to Local Franchise (Rebels)

by Christina Hellmich (2012)

Related information:
Reading University, Faculty Directory

Buy & Give

Dr Hellmich is a specialist in the Middle East politics (especially Yemen and the Arab Gulf) with a particular research interest in Political Islam, International Security and Global Health. During fieldwork in Iraq and the Yemen she has conducted extensive research into the role of Islamic preaching in the process of radicalization as well as gender relations and women’s health. Her recent work examined the contested nature of Al-Qaeda and changing notions of the Pan-Islamic ideal.


Art of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market

by Noah Horowitz (2014)

Social:
LinkedIn

Buy & Give

Horowitz exposes the inner workings of the contemporary art market, explaining how this unique economy came to be, how it works, and where it’s headed.


Asia in Washington: Exploring the Penumbra of Transnational Power

by Kent E. Calder (2014)

Related information:
Johns Hopkins Faculty Directory
Wikipedia

Buy & Give

In Asia in Washington, longtime Asia analyst Kent Calder examines the concept of “global city” in the context of international affairs. The term typically has been used in an economic context, referring to centers of international finance and commerce such as New York, Tokyo, and London. But Calder extends the concept to political centers as well—particularly in this case, Washington, D.C.


Emotional Branding: The New Paradigm for Connecting Brands to People

by Marc Gobe (2010)

Buy & Give

Emotional Branding explores how effective consumer interaction needs to be about senses and feelings, emotions and sentiments. Not unlike the Greek culture that used philosophy, poetry, music, and the art of discussion and debate to stimulate the imagination, the concept of emotional branding establishes the forum in which people can convene and push the limits of their creativity.


How the Poor Can Save Capitalism: Rebuilding the Path to the Middle Class

by John Hope Bryant (2014)

Social:
LinkedIn

Related information:
Operation HOPE
Blog

Buy & Give

Business and political leaders are ignoring the one force that could truly re-energize the stalled American economy: the poor.


How to Write Anything: A Complete Guide

by Laura Brown (2014)

Social:
LinkedIn

Related information:
howtowriteanything.com
laurabrowncommunications.com/about/

Buy & Give

Grounded in a common-sense approach, friendly and supportive, How to Write Anything is Internet-savvy, with advice throughout about choosing the most appropriate medium for your message: e-mail or pen and paper. At once a how-to, a reference book, and a pioneering guide for writing in a changing world, this is the only writing resource you’ll ever need.


Living on a Dollar a Day, The Lives and Faces of The World’s Poor

by Thomas A. Nazario and Renée C. Byer (2014)

Thomas A. Nazario:
LinkedIn
Foundation Website
Personal Website

Renée C. Byer:
LinkedIn
Twitter

Buy & Give

Living on a Dollar a Day shares the personal stories of some these poorest of the poor, honoring their lives, their struggles, and encouraging action in those who can help. In making this beautiful and moving book a team traveled to four continents, took thousands of photographs, conducted numerous interviews, and researched information on the agencies around the world that strive to help the destitute.


StoryBranding 2.0 (Second edition) Creating Stand-Out Brands Through the Purpose of Story

by Jim Signorelli (2014)

Social:
LinkedIn

Related information:
eswstorylab.com/storybranding

Buy & Give

StoryBranding 2.0 is an innovative approach to marketing’s biggest challenges, making it an indispensable book for professionals, academics, and beginners alike.


The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown

by Paul Taylor (2014)

Related information:
Pew Research

Buy & Give

Drawing on Pew Research Center’s extensive archive of public opinion surveys and demographic data, The Next America is a rich portrait of where we are as a nation and where we’re headed—toward a future marked by the most striking social, racial, and economic shifts the country has seen in a century.


The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things

by Daniel Kellmereit and Daniel Obodovski (2013)

Daniel Kellmereit
LinkedIn

Daniel Obodovski
LinkedIn

Buy & Give

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the interconnection of uniquely identifiable embedded computing devices within the existing Internet infrastructure. These devices are will usher-in automation in nearly all fields. The Silent Intelligence identifies and explores the ecosystem of Connected Cities, Connected Homes, Connected Health and Connected Cars.


The Story of Purpose: The Path to Creating a Brighter Brand, a Greater Company, and a Lasting Legacy

by Joey Reiman (2012)

Social
LinkedIn
Facebook

Buy & Give

A proven methodology for building a purpose-powered organization
Some ideas are bigger than others, and the Master Idea—your company’s purpose—is the biggest. Whether addressing communication between leadership and associates, suppliers to manufacturers, sales force to customers, or brand to consumers, The Story of Purpose details a proven methodology for businesses, small to large, how to build a purpose-inspired organization to positively impact employees, customers, and the bottom line.


The Taliban Revival: Violence and Extremism on the Pakistan-Afghanistan Frontier

by Hassan Abbas (2014)

Social
LinkedIn

Related information
School webpage

Buy & Give

Abbas traces the roots of religious extremism in the area and analyzes the Taliban’s support base within Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas. In addition, he explores the roles that Western policies and military decision making— not to mention corruption and incompetence in Kabul—have played in enabling the Taliban’s resurgence.


Wealth Management Unwrapped

by Charlotte B. Beyer (2014)

Social
LinkedIn

Related information
wealthmanagementunwrapped.com

Buy & Give

In her new book, Wall Street veteran and Institute for Private Investors (IPI) founder Charlotte Beyer sheds light on the complex wealth management industry, outlines the responsibility that all investors have as ‘CEOs’ of their own wealth, and equips them with the tools to effectively manage their money.


Who Owns the Future?

by Jaron Lanier (2014)

Related information
jaronlanier.com
Wikipedia
Article

Buy & Give

Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality and one of the world’s most brilliant thinkers. Who Owns the Future? is his visionary reckoning with the most urgent economic and social trend of our age: the poisonous concentration of money and power in our digital networks.


Zen and Zen Classics, Vol. 5: Twenty-Four Zen Essays

by R. H. Blyth (1966)

Related information
Wikipedia

Buy & Give
R. H. Blyth Books

This 5th volume of the series on Zen is a step forward in the direction of a universal Zen, a Zen which will include Chinese and Japanese Zen, and not omit that of Christian and Islamic mysticism, of Dante, Eckhart, Wordsworth, and Thoreau.


Click here to nominate your Book of the Year 2014.

2014 : BRANDS TO WATCH
PRICING ENGINE

Pricing Engine is the most innovative digital advertising solution for very small businesses.

Jeremy Kagan and Yagmur Coker, the co-founders of Pricing Engine, launched the first digital advertising solution in March of 2013 to help Very Small Businesses (VSB’s) compete against big companies.

Small businesses owners, who often lack time and money, use Pricing Engine’s one-stop-shop to easily buy, manage, and optimize digital advertising campaigns across multiple channels including Google, Bing, Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Reddit, and Foursquare.

It’s the only platform, where VSB’s with small budgets can quickly create one campaign and push it to multiple ad channels.

Pricing Engine not only created the most comprehensive suite of ad channels for VSB’s, it also gives the most actionable and easy-to-understand results based on advanced peer benchmarking algorithms.

So, immediately after launching a campaign, small business owners receive a Report Card with simple letter grades that lets them know how their campaign is performing compared to other similar businesses.

The team launched a few ad channels with over a thousand customers last March, but has grown to eight ad channels and a reach of hundreds of thousands of customers with its multiple, major resellers. Based on their unique data, they are releasing ongoing reports about how small business use digital advertising.

Pricing Engine will spend 2014 further carving out its leadership in serving the Very Small Business (VSB) market of main street, local and startup businesses.

Kudo’s to Pricing Engine for simply improving digital advertising!

Contact:
Pricing Engine
175 Varick Street, New York, NY 1001
Website: PricingEngine.com
Email: info@pricingengine.com
Tel: 415.617.9698

Mary Olson’s Best Business Picks, 2013 – LEVERAGEDWISDOM

LEVERAGEDWISDOM, founded by Richard Lavin is a remarkable business model. Lavin created a member community for entrepreneurs, owners and CEO's of privately held businesses. Recently, Richard discussed the tackling tough questions that keep owners of privately held businesses up at night. Two scenarios:

What’s the expiration date on your business, service, product, sales process? When will your top sales person stop producing at a peak rate? Is your customer base no longer loyal?  As CEO, if you are incapacitated what happens?

The stark reality is that there is life cycle to everything. The Panama Canal had to be widened. What happened to Kodak? Steve Jobs died. TB became resistant to the preferred drug protocol.

Is your equipment delimiting your growth or ability to deliver new products? Will your customers abandon you for the "new, new"? Is it a fad or trend? Do you have the banking resources to go the distance?

Are you making, selling, servicing or supplying "Twinkies"?

Tough questions are often difficult to ask within your own leadership team because everyone has an agenda and a vested interest in the status quo. Further, calling into question each other’s competencies, judgment and vision is threatening.

In these situations, LEVERAGEDWISDOM CEOs have found the confidential setting of our meetings to be a place they can openly discuss their concerns about all of the above, without risking undermining the confidence of their team or telegraphing their next move.  Further they’re able to candidly discuss their personal financial risks or the financial commitment needed to support change.

On the other hand, an enlightened management team can take on these tough questions through the strategic planning process. (Though, the team will rarely assess the personal financial, reputational and psychological risks of the owning CEO.)

The classic strategic planning scenario is to put on the wall sticky flip chart pages titled Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT Analysis). Management dutifully fills out the pages, votes on priorities and builds a consensus view as to what the team should be focusing on during the next 12 to 36 months.

CEOs at LEVERAGEDWISDOM find the most important and therefore most challenging conversations around the headings Weaknesses, defined as internal weaknesses and Threats, defined as external threats.

Internal weaknesses and External threats are where in the strategy session the leadership team becomes most vulnerable and has to work outside their comfort zone. That’s why we like to start with these two categories and drill down to expose frailties. This takes courage; but, eventually, these are the discussions that lead to the biggest breakthroughs and real opportunities.

Whatever the setting, wise leaders work hard to get out of their own comfort zone and push their leadership team get out of theirs.

To continue the conversation, you can reach Richard Lavin at 917 405 6987.


Richard Lavin, Founder
LEVERAGEDWISDOM

richard.lavin@leveragedwisdom.com
leveragedwisdom.com
linkedin.com/in/richardlavin
 

LEVERAGED WISDOM HITS IT OUT OF THE PARK

LEVERAGED WISDOM is an exceptional resource for entrepreneurs and CEO's of privately held businesses who want to increase the equity value of their business.

Consider Richard Lavin's model of monthly peer group meetings and one to one coaching, gain powerful insight into the distinctions between owning, leading or managing a business and how these important differences impact their decision making process, strategic plans and operating disciplines, all of which ultimately define the equity value of their business and the opportunity for a liquidity event.

Richard Lavin is the founder of LEVERAGED WISDOM and a remarkable resource. Feel free to send Richard a message on Linkedin.